Friday, May 04, 2012

Energy Transition: Amory Lovins: A 50-year plan for energy and Electric Cars



  This is the video to watch for everybody worried about Electric Cars "sucking all the electricity" out of the grid. There is the way forward - there are ways to produce, distribute and conserve energy more efficiently. Reinventing Fire - lets spread this out.



Alternative Energy and Electric Cars in UK - National Grid | Fully Charged

"Electricity is here already and its mix is improving with introducing of more natural gas, wind and solar generation. We can bring our Electric Cars out now. Smart Grid will allow to optimise and manage all power generation sources, transmission of electricity and its distribution, including the charging of electric cars."


 "Slowly, but surely "news" about The Peak Oil and The End of Cheap Oil is making its way into the media and government circles. Truth can not suppressed forever.  Charles Hall presents in front of UK lawmakers."



Peak Oil: The Economist: Feeling Peaky: The Economic Impact of High Prices


"It is the case, when who is telling you - is the most important part in the message. Vested interests would like you to believe that that there is no issues with Oil. If you are still wondering about the rising Gas prices at the pump make some research - we will provide the good start. The Ugly Truth is that there is NO more Cheap Oil left and oil prices will go down only when economy starts chocking again."






Lithium Rush: The Art Of War In The Markets: China Getting Ready For 5 Million Electric Cars by 2020

"Electric Cars produce the one life time opportunity for China now - do not get us wrong, not everything is driven by the ancient wisdom of "The Art Of War", but just look at what people are doing and not what they are talking about.  It is the most apparent situation  in the strategic commodities markets - Rare Earths are already controlled by ChinaGraphite is under the siege and Lithium is the next frontier. Despite all noise in the media, China is steadily implementing its 12th Five Year Plan - to build the new strategic industry based on Electric Cars."

A prosperous, secure, and climate-stable world must shift from fossil fuels to efficient use and benign supply. The pieces of this puzzle are now falling into place in a detailed transdisciplinary synthesis underway at Rocky Mountain Institute for publication in September 2011. Existing and emerging technology, integrative design (often with expanding returns to investments in energy productivity), and aggressive but strategically advantageous market deployment can displace all U.S. oil and coal by 2050. Rather than requiring mandates and carbon pricing, this transition can be driven by new competitive strategies and business models supported by innovative public policies. Rapidly emerging shifts to platform-fit, electrified autos and to an efficient, diverse, distributed, renewable electricity system also offer important risk-management, security, and resilience benefits. In short, defossilizing fuels can be led by business for profit, with net-present-valued private internal benefits in the trillions of dollars.

Amory Lovins
Chairman and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute
Chairman Emeritus of Fiberforge Corporation

Physicist Amory Lovins is Chairman and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute and Chairman Emeritus of Fiberforge Corporation. His wide-ranging innovations in energy, security, environment, and development have been recognized by the Blue Planet, Volvo, Onassis, Nissan, Shingo, and Mitchell Prizes, MacArthur and Ashoka Fellowships, the Benjamin Franklin and Happold Medals, 11 honorary doctorates, honorary membership of the American Institute of Architects, Fellowship of the Royal Society of Arts, Foreign Membership of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and the Heinz, Lindbergh, Right Livelihood, National Design, and World Technology Awards. He advises governments and major firms worldwide on advanced energy and resource efficiency, has briefed 20 heads of state, and has led the technical redesign of more than $30 billion worth of industrial facilities in 29 sectors to achieve very large energy savings at typically lower capital cost. A Harvard and Oxford dropout, he has published 29 books and hundreds of papers and has taught at eight universities, most recently as a 2007 visiting professor in Stanford University's School of Engineering. In 2009, Time named him one of the 100 most influential people in the world, and Foreign Policy, one of the 100 top global thinkers.
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